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Items filtered by date: Monday, 21 May 2018 - Imphal Times - A Daily Eveninger

Non local run Floor Mill granted Rs. 8 crore as loan from SBI using fake documents

IT News
Imphal, May 21,

When unemployed youths of the state faced hardship in getting loan from banks even after being selected as beneficiary under the PMEGP Scheme, State Bank of India had granted a loan of Rs. 8 crore to the proprietor of the M.R. Roller Flour Mill constructed at Agricultural Land at Mantripukhri area.
Mahendra Kumar Jain, the proprietor beside failing to clear the dept had not filed any Income Tax returns since the financial year 2015-2016.
Source said that the Jamabandi and other document are not clear and appeared to be fake which the bank authority too are left in deep crisis in recovering the loan.

A source said that the owner of M. R. Roller Flour Mills TIN Number: 01431000911112 , PAN Number: AAOF6952B, Mantripukhri, Imphal East, Manipur-795002. Mr. Mahendra Kumar Jain, PAN Number: AERPJ7290Q of Account Number State Bank of India M.G Avenue Branch Manipur, 31734560718, has been found holding a factory on an agricultural land (Phoural) (Imphal Times have the Documents). The bank granted the proprietor a loan of the sum of amount of Rs. 8 crore against the Account Number State Bank of India, M.G. Avenue Branch Manipur, 31781664257 in fake document.
The proprietor had also not filed any Income Tax returns since the financial year 2015-2016. The source said that he also failed to pay adequate Sales Tax VAT returns and Income Tax returns since the financial year 2012.
Data’s in Sales Tax and VAT returns are found with a huge difference. His personal account states below the sum of Rs. 1030/-  and no business transaction has been witnessed by the firm, M. R. Roller Flour Mills. The proprietor of M.R. Roller Flour Mill, did not yet register his stocks worth of more than 14 crore under The Goods & Services Act, as shown in last return of the financial year of 2015-2016, the source said.
The proprietor of M.R. Roller Flour Mill, Mr. Mahendra Kumar Jain, owns properties across the country namely, multiple flats in the city of Guwahati, Delhi, Bombay; Bungalows in Jaipur, Lands in Bangalore which is more than the sum of amount of Rs. 200 Cr.
Concern government authority have not taken up any action as of now as per the source available with Imphal Times.

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AMSU stage protest against Citizenship (Amendment Bill) 2016; submits memorandum

IT News
Imphal, May 21,

All Manipur Students’ Union (AMSU) today staged a sit-in demonstration in protest against the passing of the Citizenship (Amendment) Bill 2016.
The protest is being staged across the North Eastern States as per announcement of the North East Students’ Organisation (NESO), which is a conglomerate if students’ bodies from across the 7 North eastern states of India. AMSU is a component of the NESO and have been associating at any issue which hurt the sentiment of the people of the North East region.
“The Citizenship (Amendment) Bill , 2016 is a serious threat to the indigenous people of the North Eastern States as it will allow infiltration of more illegal migrants to the region where problem of illegal migrant had already affected the people”, a representative of the AMSU said while talking to media persons.

He added that granting of citizenship to illegal migrants from outside the country can never be accepted by the AMSU.
Earlier , Representatives of AMSU along with partners of NESO had met the Joint Parliamentary Committee On Citizenship (Amendment) Bill,2016 at Shillong and expressed strong opposition to the passing of the Bill.
The protest gains momentum at Assam and in Manipur too protest against illegal migrants in Manipur spearheaded by the AMSU under the slogan “Go back Foreigner” had almost burnt the state. 2 student protestors lost their live in the course of agitation. The MASU had already signed memorandum of understanding twice with the government to flush out the illegal migrants from the state in 1990 and 1994, said a representative of the AMSU.
The AMSU also express strong apprehension about making Manipur a dumping zone for illegal migrant as the government is trying to pass the Citizenship (Amendment) Bill, 2016 while the demand for passing of Inner Line Permit System legislation still  is kept pending.
At around noon representatives of the AMSU comprising of General Secretary of NESO Sinam Prakash, President of AMSU Manjit Sarangthem among others submitted a memorandum to the governor of Manipur while other volunteers of the AMSU stage protest at Keishampat Community Hall.  

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Ravi statement on Naga Accord: No Clarification Made, Agitation Continues

IT News
Imphal, May 21,

With no clarification came from Prime Minister, Narendra Modi and Home Minister, Kiren Rijiju against the provocation statement given by interlocutor RN. Ravi in national media in connection with the Naga Accord, civil organizations of the state continue its protest.
A sit-in-protest cum public meeting was jointly organised by Khwairamband Apunba Ima Keithel (KAIK), United Committee Manipur (UCM), All Manipur United Clubs’ Organisation (AMUCO) and Committee of Civil Societies of Kangleipak (CCSK) at Khwairamband Keithel, Imphal, today.
Speaking to media persons, AMUCO president, Ph. Devan Sharma said the statement given by interlocutor RN. Ravi on April 26, 2018  on a national media has created an enormous threat to the integrity of Manipur state.
In the statement given by R.N. Ravi shows pity politics being played to the people of the state in the name of assuring valley area protection bill and removal of AFSPA while their main ideology is to create hatred among the different communities of the state. A territorial Council one specific community is nothing but spewing venom to the unity of the various ethnic communty in the state.
Sunil Karam, UCM president said that as per the agreement signed with Home Minister, it was agreed that stakeholders and Manipur Government will be consulted before finalizing the framework agreement. Sunil said the statement given by R.N. Ravi about establishment of  Autonomous Naga Territorial Council and Common Naga Cultural Body seems to be stated in conivance with the Prime Minister as there is no clarification from his side.
“ The Prime Minister of India should clarify over the statement of R.N. Ravi”, Sunil added.
Sunil also said that on May 6, 2018, the civil organization has sought for clarification from the concern but till date no positive response has been given which is very unfortunate. Since that various form of agitation has been carrying out in the state and until their demands is made their will be no drawback, even the situation may get worst if the clarification is made at the earliest.
Jeetendra Ningomba, Vice President CCSK said that no clarification till that despite submission od numerous memorandums and demands made by the civil organization regarding the Naga Accord and statement made by RN. Ravi clearly shows that the Centre is utilising the interlocutor to calculate the sentiment of the Manipur people.
People of Manipur will not tolerate such act by the Prime Minister, Home Minister and concern government, he added.
Later, 16 members including 8 Imas from Apunba Khwairamband Keithel and 8 leaders of Civil Organisation UCM, AMUCCO and CCSK submitted a memorandum to Governor of Manipur.
Meanwhile, most of the shops in Khwairamband Keithel including, Paona Keithel, Thangal Keithel, MG Avenue, etc remains close due to the sit-in cum public meeting held today which gave an inconveniences to the public marketing.

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AMSU and CADA organised anti drug campaign

IT News
Imphal, May 21,

All Manipur Students’ Union (AMSU) and Coalition Against Drugs and Alcohol (CADA) organised anti drug campaign at Gem School at Kairang in Imphal East  under the theme “Lets Stand Against Substance Abuse” at 11.30 am today. Ningthoujam Doren - Vice President - CADA , Kh. Robindro – Administrative Officer , Gem School and Longjam Brojen - Library & Documentation Secretary , AMSU attended the awareness campaign as dignitaries on the dais.
Geetchandra Mangang - Secretary Finance of CADA attended as resource persons.
Speaking on the occasion Geetchandra said that a youth started abusing drug from his family, so family members particularly the parents should be careful while taking care of their children.

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‘Certificates and pass book of differently abled persons kept in custody of some persons’

IT News
Imphal, May 21,
Relief Centre for the Welfare of Differently Abled Persons, Manipur organised a Home Based Intervention Programme at Kangu Chingjin Khunou, Takhel, Kongpal and  Khurai  area yesterday. 
Awareness on how to obtain certificates for disability were relayed to the Differently Abled Persons of the area. Some of the differently abled person of the area had stated that their certificates and bank pass book have been kept in the custody of vested interested persons. Many have no knowledge of the beneficiary provided by the government for the welfare of them.

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Women’s inclusion in every platform is a necessity: Th Radheshyam

DIPR
Imphal, May 21,

Education Minister  Thokchom Radheshyam said that women’s inclusion in every societal platform is a necessity to define and fulfil the real essence of women empowerment. He stressed that the women need to be strong to participate in the events organised at local as well as higher level so that the movement of empowering women could begin from the grassroots levels and make it spread.
The Minister said that women or girls should be embraced as a key member in decision making of any societal or political events rather than limiting their task in welcoming of guest. He was speaking as the Chief Guest at - A Two Day National Seminar on Human Development and Gender organised by the Ideal Girl’s College, Akampat, Imphal East, with financial assistance from Department of Social Welfare and Department of University and Higher Education, Government of Manipur.
Th. Radheshyam asserted that research should be carried out focussing on certain factors of political, social, and economic with a focus to gender justice. It is necessary to check and encourage women and girls perform and participate in these factors. He said, human development can be achieved only when the environment is taken into consideration, since human cannot exist in isolation. No human can survive without nature, he added. He opined that human need to open up more to become innovative and creative and guide the young minds towards the achievement of better and an inclusive society. He added that the teachers as well as the students need to inculcate a habit to question for enriching one’s thinking capability. Education, he explained is not just to get a degree but to enable one to think and work for the progress of the society and country as whole.
International Secretary, Council for Teacher Education, Prof. Nilima Bhagabati said that many obstacles need to be overcome by prioritising and emphasising equal treatment and participation of women. Participation by women from all spheres of life is important to empower women, she added.
Highlighting the theme of the Two Day National Seminar, Additional Director University and Higher Dr. L. Iboyaima said that human development is about giving people more freedom and opportunities to live lives they value. He said that gender identity is a social construct while sexual identity is biological.
The seminar has been organised to draw a road map for human development by focussing the importance of gender equity and removing all the discriminations and differences which are the hurdles of human development.
The inauguration was attended by the Principal of various colleges, professors, paper presenters and students. Later, the Minister accompanied by the Principal and staff of the college inspected the college premise.

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Contribution of Manipuri Women in the Socio-Economic Aspect is Significant - Nemcha Kipgen

DIPR
Imphal, May 21,

Social Welfare and Cooperation Minister,  Nemcha Kipgen today released a survey report publication on Socio-Economic Status of Women in Manipur by Drishti Stree Adhyayan Prabodhan Kendra (Women Studies and Training Centre), Pune, held at Court Hall, Manipur University.
Addressing the gatherings as Chief Guest, Minister Nemcha stated that the contribution of Manipuri women in the socio-economic aspect is significantly large; whether in the organized or unorganized sector, they have been making their presence felt everywhere. Our women have also been known for their courage, skill and active involvement in many social, economic, political and cultural activities, she added. Minister Nemcha Kipgen highlighted the several schemes introduced by the Central Government and State Government for the empowerment and welfare of women; the prime goals of all such schemes for women is to provide them protection, better health facilities, enough education to make them employable and to make them financially strong.
Nemcha called upon all the women to avail various welfare schemes introduced by the Government introduced with a main aim to uplift their life socially and economically and assured that none of the deserving ones for any social schemes will be denied of their rights.
Drishti Stree Adhyayan Prabodhan Kendra (Women Studies and Training Centre), is a centre of information documentation and research related to women issues. The report is based on the study on parameters like: education, health, employment and social status, their role in social interactions, family system, marriage system, etc. along with the impact of geographicl conditions, political scenario and political psyche on their lives.
Founder Trustee, Drishti Stree Adhyayan Prabodhan Kendra, Miss Geeta Gunde, Dean, School of Life Science, Manipur University, Prof. G.A. Shantibala Devi, Secretary, Dr. Anjali Deshpande, Geeta Gokhale also graced the occasion as Chairperson, Guest of Honour,President, special guest respectively and concern officials faculties and students of Manipur University were also part of the release function

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Challenges to Digital India initiatives


In today’s connected world, it is becoming increasingly impossible to stay off the grid for even a single day. Digital network has invaded the personal space to such an extent that almost every aspect of our social life- be it relating to work, commerce, education, leisure or health have increasingly been depending on it, the most significant feature of the digital revolution being the convenience and transparency it afforded. The government of India, as a significant part of its plan to revolutionise and revamp the country and make it a truly digital nation by offering a plethora of e-governance services across sectors using mobility, cloud, analytics etc have envisaged a mission which, if implemented systematically and efficiently, will pave the way for an improved and efficient administration and transparent governance.
But there still is many a slip between the cup and the lip. While the vision which will propel our country into its next phase of growth can be applauded and appreciated, it is imperative that various concerns of which there are quite a few are addressed and analysed to make the mission attain its objective. The Digital India programme with the expenditure doubled to rupees 3,073 crore for the next fiscal year against rupees 1,425.63 crore in 2017-18 has been welcomed by the industry and is expected to make significant changes for the better. The operating model and management on the supply side of the proposed transformation requires thoughtful and meticulous planning and phased implementation with continuous feedback to ensure that the impact is as radical and far reaching as envisaged. For that to happen, the digital infrastructure is required to be put in place, of which the telecom infrastructure will form the base on top of which software, apps etc of IT infrastructure is required. More importantly, the contents of these websites, apps, softwares etc needs to be relevant to the needs and requirements of the citizens and address their real time requirements- an issue that is proving to be the biggest hurdle that the government and its resources have yet to effectively tackle, and also the capacity of the infrastructure to cater to the digital demand of the citizens of the country. The biggest challenge to the whole mission still remains that of the change management as the government as an established system of administration has been working in its own particular and well-oiled manner with its in-built sub-systems of considerations, unofficial deals and other forms of inducements to work the chain. The mentality and outlook of these employees and other human resources needs to be changed to be able to attune to the changing work environment and the challenges it brings. The removal of avenues for unofficial personal gains might deter a number of these employees to embrace the change or adapt themselves to the new work culture.
Every departmental heads must be handed the onus of inducing a sense of excitement and positive challenge to the changes that must be made for the grand mission to succeed. Reorientation workshops, seminars and departmental debates with experienced resource persons can motivate the human workforce in no small measure. At the end of the day, it is the human factor that will determine whether the digital dream will be realized or otherwise. Machines and gadgets are as effective and efficient as the person operating them. Human effort, or the lack of it will be the ultimate decider on the grand dream the country is still dreaming.

Discovery and Estrangement: Coloniality of the Postcolonial

This write up is an excerpt from Prof. Angomcha Bimol’s speech delivered on 10th June 2006 under the tittle “Towards a Wholesome Holistic Self On Silence, Identity and Coloniality of the Postcolonial”,  on occasion of Arambam Somorendra Memorial Lecture here in Imphal

Ladies and Gentlemen, sometimes we become aware of certain aspects of ourselves through our encounter with certain specific experiences, and some of them leave behind lasting impact on our sense of self. For the people in the ex-colonies of the former European powers, that experience has been their encounter with the ideas, practices and conditions of colonial modernity. In fact, if some historians are to be believed, most of the “categories” that form the basis of the present identities in South Asia – including Manipur – were, and still are, mediated by the colonial mappings of lands and their inhabitants initiated by the British administration.
The exercise that began in the later part of the 19th century was a response to the imperatives of colonial administration of the British Raj in South Asia. Colonial modernity, a specific set of ideas, practices and institutions born of an unholy marriage between European modernity and colonialism, informed this exercise. With certain characteristic ideas of history and progress of the European modernity, Hegel announces, while acknowledging that “the English are the lords” of South Asia, that “it is the necessary fate of Asiatic empires to be subjected to Europeans”. In a similar vein, Marx also terms the British rule in South Asia as the “unconscious tool of history” to transform the people from their “Asiatic mode of production”. The “civilized” Europeans with “history” were contrasted with the “primitive savages”, the “people without history”, to use the Hegelian phrase, while mapping the peoples and lands in South Asia. It was also an exercise conditioned by the imperative to politically control the “natives” – especially after 1857 – and to organize and enhance the revenue collection of the Raj. It was under such imperatives of colonial modernity that the British also mapped the people in Manipur valley as people with “comparative civilization” and those in its hills as “barbarians”. Such classification was further reified with institutional measures such as the introduction of administrative separation between the valley and hills. While certain forms of pre-colonial distinction between groups of people we re-rendered, consolidated and reified, earlier forms of relation and shared spaces were reordered in terms of new distinct and separate categories.
It was these categories of colonial state of the British Indian Empire which was re-rendered by the postcolonial Indian state in the 1950s in terms of “scheduled tribes”, “scheduled castes” and “general category” in Manipur. Subsequent conversion of the “general category” into “OBC” has only deepened the power of the exogenously derived self-definition of the people under the postcolonial state that has inherited mush of its structures and spirit from its preceding colonial state.
Those exogenously ascribed self-definition of the people inform the way people in Manipur think about themselves and how they relate to each other. In fact, the pride derived from a self-definition rooted in the Aryan narrative, which itself has not been free from the idea of the “Indic civilization” discovered by the Western modernity through its orientalist enterprise, has been complimented by the definition of being called a “singular oasis of comparative civilization”. Incidentally, the underlying “exceptionalism” that affirms the assumptions of the non-Europeans as “savages” or “people without history” and the implied “regressive history” in the works of European ethnographers, seem to have escaped most people as they take pride in the masters’ acknowledgement of their self as a “comparative civilization”! Of course, the pride of the self also embraces a new selfhood of being a “backward” community on the basis of expected material benefits. Similarly, some live with the pejorative aspects of being a “tribe”, which itself is not free from the “conceptual-ideological structuring” of the colonial knowledge, along with the sense of security as a Scheduled Tribe under the patronage of the postcolonial state.
With these self-definitions, the people in Manipur are also located within a schizophrenic ambience. The dominant historical narrative of the “Indian nation”, while giving legitimacy to the postcolonial Indian state, renders them historically “invisible”. (Histories from Manipur and the Northeast are more or less absent in the renderings of the history of India; perhaps following the legacy of colonial modernity that they are “tribes” and “people without history” or simply that they are not Indians in the eyes of that history). Similarly, the state claims them as “citizens” while simultaneously “suspecting” their “loyalty” and “devotion”. (Founding fathers of postcolonial Indian state like Sardar Patel had expressed such a suspicion to Jawaharlal Nehru in one of his letters in 1950).
Besides these ideological moorings, the people of Manipur, and Northeast in general, also find themselves structurally caught in a political economy marked by the “patron-client” relation between New Delhi and the region. These ideological and structural aspects of the postcolonial state crucially structure the estrangement of identities. The identity-based conflicts in the region, suspicion between communities, efforts to draw more attention and favours from New Delhi for one community over the other, or fight for a little more share of the spoil ( of the grant-in-aid economy) for oneself, are not the only ones that mark such an estrangement. Even the capacity to come to terms with one’s own “different moments of self” is also jeopardized by such a context.
Mr. Chairperson, let me end this lecture with a few posers for us to reflect on this aspect. For that, allow me to get back to one of my favourite ways of knowing: sharing a story. This is a part of a story that I call the “Discovery of ‘Mother Manipur’”. Recounting his experiences as a Manipuri outside Manipur in his youth in the late 1950s and early 1960s, Shri Nongmaithem Pahari, the “melody king of Manipur”, wrote in his memoire, Eigee Diary-da-gee:
Mapan-da leiraba matam-da Manipur Ima-gee
Aasheng-ba mashak aa-do khanglak-le. Mapan-
Gee mee-shingna aekhoi-bu mashak khang-bee-
-da-ba, Manipur kadai-da lei hai-ba khang-
-da-ba, aekhoi-bu yam-na hantha-na lou-ba
puum-namak aasee khanglak-le. (We began to know the real identity of Mother
Manipur after we had been staying outside(the
State). That the outsiders (people outside
Manipur) do not know “us” (our identity),
that they do not even know where Manipur is,
and their comtemptuous outlook towards us –
all these we came to know.) a – n
These lies register a moment of coming of awareness of a self through a simultaneous awareness of its own “invisibility” in the eyes of the others, and a humiliating experience with those others. In my reading, these lines powerfully and poignantly communicate the discovery of atext within a context, which smacks of coloniality. The inferior and humiliating status of the historically “invisible” subjects – “people without history” – is not alien to the colonial condition. The story of this discovery of “Mother Manipur” by Shri Pahari is by no means a unique individual story; many generations of Manipuris who have gone outside the State have encountered similar moments of awareness. It is this nature of the discovery that has critically shaped the tenor of the narrative of Manipuri selfhood during the period we call the “postcolonial”. Fired by a need that “we must have a history”, the culturally humiliated colonial subjects in South Asia ventured into a nationalist enterprise to counter the colonial insinuation of their inferiority, which led to the “discovery of India”. Likewise, Manipuris also seemed to have ventured into a similar journey of nationalist self-discovery. A strand of political consciousness and turmoil that have marked Manipur since 1960s are not alien to this journey.
Significantly, the above lines from the memoires appeared in a section where Shri Pahari was narrating a meeting with his old friend Shri Arambam Somorendra in Lucknow while they were in their late 20s. One of the things they shared in that meeting was also the question of Merger of Manipur in 1949. Given the familiar developments that followed their coming back to Manipur in the early parts of 1960s,the two seemed to have discovered not only “Mother Manipur” but also the nature of postcolonial India in the “hindi-Hindu heartland” of the Indian nation. This discovery seems to have produced discernible impacts on many Manipuris.
Mr. Chairperson, the denials and rejections that accompanied the discovery have been a part of the self-estrangement that we see in Manipur today. Many in the second generation of Manipuris of the twentieth century find it difficult to own up the legacies of the first generation. Just as “India” seems to have become alien (oppressor) to many of the former, the latter also seems to have become an uneasy aspect of their collective self. To many, in fact, the first generation appeared as “collaborators”, albeit seen as innocent or ignorant, of building India with the blood of Manipur. To them, the Merger of Manipur in 1949 comes to be the moment “Manipur became a part of India”, the beginning of a subjugated life.
Ladies and gentlemen, these are the parts of the stories of our selfhood. And we will continue to tell these stories time and again as we week to reaffirm and refashion our selfhood. However, we need to understand that the story of the predicament of the postcolonial to be “post” even after the end of formal colonialism are not confined to South Asia, including Manipur. It has been a story of the ex-colonies, and even the ex-colonizers, across the globe. People informed by postcolonial consciousness seem to have the confidence to engage with those predicaments. Many of them are going through critical self-appraisals of themselves and others to understand and refashion their lives. If this is the case, allow me to leave behind two questions, which I think, are crucial for us to refashion a wholesome holistic self.
First, when did Manipur become a part of “India”? Was it 27 April 1891 or 11 August 1947 or 15 October 1949 or any other date?
Second, did coloniality depart or arrive in Manipur in the “postcolonial”?

Looking beyond ideal relationship for want of baby boy

By: Lalita
There are many schemes to encourage giving birth to girl child. Already many schemes like paying of few amount, or depositing of insurance for the girl child at the time birth has been introduced by the government of India. Beti Padoa , Beti Bachoa is the new scheme launched by the government. In a country like India the more the girl child are deprived the more new schemes were introduced for them.
In our state, Manipur , where women are uphold to the highest position, many parents are not happy until they get a boy child.
At many incident husband were compelled to marry another wife just because his wife could not deliver any baby boy: Recently a woman was finally forced to stay separately from her husband and in-laws in a village in Kakching district allegedly for giving birth to three daughters and not bearing a male child in eight years of married life.
This is not an isolated incident that happened in the state. We keep hearing about these cases on and off.
 In the land where women’s courage was the talk of every politicians or civil rights activist there are families or spouse where the girl child is murdered in the foetus. What a pitiable state of affairs! The problem is also common in South Indian States too. A writer wrote, “We had a young attendant for my ailing mother at home and this girl whose name was Pothum Ponnu (Enough of girls). She was the fifth girl in the family and she was not perturbed by the name. But we were. She explained that it was common in their villages to name the girl thus to ensure that the next child would be a boy”.  What logic!
In the state of Manipur, it is not the husband which have the feeling of unsecure unless his wife have a boy but it was either the mother in law or the wife that were worried if they fail to give birth to girl child.
The issue of parents desire for baby boy has never been looked upon for a scientific solution so far.
Scientist or medical experts now finds that using chromosomes which lacks in male can be injected to fulfil the desire of the wife or family.
Men determine the sex of a baby depending on whether their sperm is carrying an X or Y chromosome. An X chromosome combines with the mother’s X chromosome to make a baby girl (XX) and a Y chromosome will combine with the mother’s to make a boy (XY). This is the medical explanation for the sex of a child.
The government, that is blasting all around with the need to build toilets, should bring to the public domain that it is the man who decides if the baby is going to be a boy or girl.

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